Vanishing Points in Prague Metro

re: Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Vanishing Point

Prague is one of the most beautiful cities in Europe.  While the bridges and old city buildings are gorgeous, I am most intrigued by the subway stations. The station designs are clinical, severe and strangely melancholy.

It is no surprise that the Prague Metro is relatively new, only forty five years old and almost entirely Russian built.

For the the CB&W challenge, I show two photos with vanishing point perspectives.

And because I like them, I include two more with absolutely no point at all.

Prague subway-122954-2

Photos in Prague, Czech Republic. 2018

 

 

Advertisements

Ce n’est pas possible

untitled-060038

In my hometown it is illegal to smoke in public places: indoors, outdoors and anywhere near a  sports field or playground.

Smoking on an outdoor patio is not possible.

This picture is not possible.

Paris, France. 2018


About this post:

If you’re a photographer, you’ll understand my obsession with smoke.

Like sunbeams and shadows, tendrils of smoke, rising but not obscuring a face, add character to a picture.  But chasing smoke is like chasing sunbeams.  It’s elusive and transient.  In urban street photography, particularly in Canada and US, it is increasingly rare.

My Health Conscious Self says “That’s a good thing.”
My Photographer Self says “There’s always Paris …”

Modern day Miss Havisham

While strolling through Parc de Sceaux I observed this lady dressed in white, complete with wedding veil and bridal bouquet.

I looked around for the wedding party, anticipating a full entourage of groom, maids and newly minted in-laws. But no, this lady was on her own.

Calmly, vacantly, stepping to music heard only by her, she ambled through the gardens, stopping occasionally to take a selfie.

Paris, France. 2018

Paper-books emulating e-books

In the New York Times there’s this article about a new book publishing trend.

Tiny books that will hold in the palm of your hand – the size of a cell phone – with a horizontal spine so that you can read  with a single finger swipe – like a cell phone.

Pardon me while I roll my eyes.  Another marketing gimmick.  Just in time for Christmas.

It’s a statement of the times, when IRL emulates tech simulating reality.

For this bookseller in Budapest, I don’t think he cares much.

Budapest, Hungary. 2018