Cuban Street Portraits

If you’re a fan of Street then you’ll know that the  #1 Fear of all new and no-so-new street photographers is the Fear of Strangers.  We all have a natural shyness about approaching strangers.  But if you’re like me, who believes that the only interesting street shot is one with a face in it, then you’ll figure out how to overcome this.

I admit that its easier to take street portraits when travelling abroad. There’s a comfortable camouflage in being a tourist. With hat, camera and obvious unfamiliarity with the language it’s easy to smile, point and share pictures on your camera.  Couple that with a few key words for beautiful, “Linda!” , “Bonito!”, “Muy hermoso!” and you have the magic for engaging with a stranger and making portraits.

The Portrait Shot

My favorite shots are those that capture an expression that hints at the personality.  Most of the time, I find it after after the initial photo, when I’ve come up close to share his/her picture on my camera’s LCD. The subject is now relaxed and I’m close enough for a very personal portrait shot.

If helps of course, to know a few more words of the language.  That way, I can walk away with a bit more knowledge of the person.   Granted, the knowledge may be incomplete and probably wrong (there’s a direct correlation between language proficiency and understanding) but at least I  have something more to remember him/her by.

The Cable Guy’s name was Alejandro (or maybe it was Guillermo.)  I’d been admiring his sturdy red truck. This being Cuba it was a solid, all metal 1960’s era vehicle, reconstructed from parts and a chimera of brands & manufacturers.  Alejandro was in the telephone cable business, he hauled telephone poles, dug & installed them … or so I understood.

The Cable Guy

Ramon the Guitar Player serenaded me with Cuban ballads played on his front porch.   He told me a long and involved story about his time in Santiago (it could have been Havana) where he met other chinos like me.

The Man in the Blue Box Balcony (sorry I don’t remember your name) was relaxing on his day off.  He asked me if I was staying at the local hotel and when I said “sí”, said that he worked there too.

Ramon the Guitarrista
Man in Blue Box Balcony

Abuelita was the charming grandmother of Tomás who found my walking group wandering in a dried out riverbed and invited us home for a visit.  Abuelita wanted to give me a manicure. Tomás introduced me to santeria … and the topic for another post.

Stay tuned until then.

Abuelita (Little Grandmother)

 

 

Chivirico, Cuba.  February 2018

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A Walk through Chivirico

Neighborhood shop

As you may have guessed, I spent the last week in Cuba, although not  (as the song says) in Havana.  Instead we stayed at a little village called Chivirico, about 90 minutes out of Santiago de Cuba and 840 km east of Havana.

Chivirico is a small rural community set between the mountains of Sierra Maestra and the Caribbean Sea.  Our guide told us that 15,000 live in Chivirico but most stay in the mountains. My estimate is that 14,524 people live in the mountains  since there was no where close to that number of people in the village. Having said that, there’s no doubt on the total population as the hamlet was well serviced with a school, a church, a couple markets, a farmacia and bus terminal.    There was also a  lot of goats.  Not surprising since goats are the village’s namesake (chivo).

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Where there are schools there will be playing fields.  Cuba’s favorite sport is baseball and on this particular afternoon, I was treated to local game.  Everyone participated, even the goats.  And for those kids not old enough for the team, there’s lots of adventure to be had in the surrounding trees.

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Chivirico, Cuba. 2018

Ooh Nah Na

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Somewhere in Canada it’s been snowing this past week.

I was not there.

Can you guess where?

If the pictures are not clue enough, the post’s title and this song are hints.   In fact, consider this song to be a backtrack for my next few posts.

Somewhere Not in Canada, February 2018

Sartorial Inequality

I suppose I should be more concerned with grander things.  Trump-o-mania. Plunging stock index. Escalating Syrian-Israeli-Iran crisis. North Korean everything.

But the thing I’d like to know is … how come Boris Pasternak ca 1920 looks like a LLBean model in 2018?

Consider the same of Virginia Woolf ca 1923.

Is there no justice in fashion evolution through the ages?  While men continue to wear the same old cable knit and trousers will women’s fashion constantly re-invent itself?

And really, will there ever be a time when floppy hats and lace curtains become stylish  again?

Oh … and if you’re keen on last week’s Lit Hub, click here.

California Jerk

The Sandy Food Chronicles

Google Jerk

This is a photo my daughter sent to me.  Here’s the chat* session we had. 


Hi Mom! This is what the cafe at work made for lunch today.

It looks like Rice & Peas ?

It’s Jamaican Rice & Peas with Jerk Chicken.

It don’t look like Jerk Chicken

The Rice & Peas was so-so and the chicken tasted

It looks like Curry Chicken

of  curry

But there’s no Curry in Jerk.
There’s no potatoes and gravy in Jerk.
All Jerk spices are black !

It didn’t taste of home at all

You should protest this

I can give them feedback

It is cultural misappropriation
of an iconic Jamaican dish.

Mom I have like
WORK to do

It’s OK dear.
You can come home and
I’ll make you real Jerk chicken

Thanks Mom!

🙂


(*) or something like it … same as much as this Californian style Jerk.

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Polka Dot Lady

Polka Dot Lady

Have you  walked through a warren of alleys, turned a corner and been startled by a cacophony of color, light and pattern?   Visuals so loud and discordant that you had to blink three times to tone it down?

This happened to me in an outdoor market in Northern Thailand. I’d stumbled into hat makers alley. A place where ladies surrounded by  gaily colored fabric,  sewed ribbons of bubbles and baubles on to hats, aprons and vests.  They draped themselves with vibrantly patterned scarves with no apparent concern for color harmony.   The laughed and chattered among themselves, ignoring the tourist fidgeting with her camera and trying to isolate a shot.

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Later when I uploaded my photos I ignored all of these photos.  I had liked one but decided that the frame was too full with color and pattern.  It was hard see the subject against the distraction of background.

Fast forward to years later.   I’m searching through my catalog looking for interesting B&W portraits.   I find this old photo and casually flick it to B&W.  What a difference.

The moral of this story?   Never discard photos that you like.  Maybe your eye saw something your brain did not. Time will tell.

Photo taken in Thailand, 2015

 

 

Fancy Shawl

The Fancy Shawl dance is the most flamboyant and energetic of  all Pow Wow women’s events.  Performers skip and jump through the air while swirling their shawls in large sweeping gestures.

The category is a relatively new one, different from the more conservative styles of the Jingle and Traditional Women’s dance.  Some say its origins lie in mimicking the  transformation of a butterfly from a cocoon. Others say that it was created by women wanting to duplicate the complex foot work of the Men’s Fancy dance.

Saga says that the first time a woman (her friend) competed, she disguised herself as a man and entered the Men’s Fancy dance.  Unexpectedly, she won!  The judges decided it was time for change and they a created brand new dance category for women.

I especially liked these shots of Saga in her Fancy Shawl regalia.  I thought the strong colors and striking poses looked powerful.  That’s representative of the dance’s origins in both cases, don’t you think?

For more explanation of the different styles of Pow Wow dances I refer you to  this article.   Although dated, the post is comprehensive and complete. It is very informative and great prep for your next Pow Wow visit.

Toronto, Canada. 2018

Jingle Dress

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The very first time I went to a Native American Pow Wow, I remember walking through the grounds and being followed by a symphony of  bells and  wind chimes.  When I looked around I was surprised to see a dancer in her Jingle dress right behind me.

The Jingle dress dance is  a simple one.   It is a ladies event and they jump up and down with their hands placed on their hips.  It is mesmerizing to watch and so easy to get lost in the rhythm of the drums and metallic clink of the bells.

Saga (my model) says that each bell is hand made and sewn individually to the dress. There can be up to  three hundred and sixty five bells, one for each day of the year.  It’s extremely heavy! Imagine jumping around with all that metal on a hot summer day. Even so, Saga says that once she gets going, she slips in to a zone where all the discomfort disappears.

The Jingle dance is associated with healing qualities.  The story goes that at the very first dance there was a sick little girl. The magic of the jingle dance roused her from her sickness and she awoke refreshed and cured.

For more history on the Jingle Dress, have a look at this documentary by PBS and produced with the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.

The Jingle Dress Dance is a popular and powerful tradition that has spread throughout America’s Native communities. Ojibwe elders offer stories of its beginnings and its healing powers, and musicians demonstrate the unique songs and rhythms of the dance. Produced with the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.

Source: The Jingle Dress Tradition – Twin Cities PBS

And now for something different …

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A new year is a good time to try something different.

After my less than illustrious foray into flash photography, I’ve been shy about doing studio shoots.  However when Hubby arranged a session with a model in Native American dress, I was more than happy to tag along.

The difference between studio and street photography is light.  In a studio, you have full control of light, in street you don’t. In street, you chase the light. In studio, you make it. There’s a lot of  technical knowledge involved in getting light to perform. Know-how and Gear and Set-up.  For this session I was glad to rely on Hubby’s expertise. My focus was on getting a few good shots.

Here’s my first set. I kept them in dramatic B&W to emphasize the shape and movement of the fancy shawl.

Saga our model had some spectacular outfits. They were all handmade with fine details and gorgeous colors.  She also had  an interesting tale about the origins of the Fancy Shawl dance event in Pow Wows … but you can read more about that in my next post.

 Toronto, Canada. 2018