Quizzical Views on the High Line

A quizzical view on the High Line

The High Line is an elevated pathway built on an old railway viaduct in west Manhattan.   It’s described as a

“living system” drawing from multiple disciplines which include landscape architecture, urban design, and ecology. Since opening in 2009, the High Line has become an icon of contemporary landscape architecture.[3]”

Along the 2.33 km walk are views of Manhattan’s urban landscapes.  Towering skyscrapers, avant garde architecture, old and new buildings.   Since it’s opening in 2009 real estate value for apartments abutting the park have climbed.

For $6 million dollars you can get a home ten meters away from a pathway sporting twenty thousand pedestrians a day.   For even more, you can watch the pedestrians from  your luxurious glass enclosed bathroom and bathtub.   It is a room with a view.  The question is, who’ll be viewing whom?

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

New York City, USA.  March 2018

Advertisements

Walking while Standing Still

SL-3220014
In Times Square, which isn’t square at all.

Have you ever had that feeling? Like you’re in a place where you’ve never been but it feels like you’ve been there many times before?  Like you’re walking and standing still at  the same time?

New York City, USA.  March 2018. 

WordPress Photo Challenge: Favorite Place

A Snowy Day in NYC

SL-123018

What do you do when you’re in New York City in the worst spring snow storm in a recent history?  You go to the museum of course.  You, Me and Fifty Thousand other people.

Like well muffled lemmings we line up at the MoMA, pay for tickets and  shuffle off to line up again for coat check. We head off to the escalators where we shuffle through five floors of exhibits.  Exquisite, gorgeous and beautiful art.

Somewhere on the second floor I  remember what a uncultured noob I am.   Oh I see the wonder of the famous Water Lillies and the brilliance of the Starry Night.  I even get the  genius of the color blocky Mondrians. I recognize the beauty and famous-ness of these pieces but I am not enthralled by them.

Instead I am drawn to the  frames of scenes outside.  Quiet and fleeting vistas of snow falling silently on brownstones across the city.

New York City, USA.  March 2018

 

Digital vs Print: When Reality Bites

I learned a harsh lesson in portraiture this week:  Digital is not the same as Print.

It’s a surprising realization that after four years of photography I’ve never actually printed my pictures.  I’ve been satisfied with sharing them here, on Flickr and  other social media. That changed when I committed to mailing prints back to the folks in Cuba.

But let’s rewind a bit.

The highlight of my recent trip  was the opportunity to take pictures of people.  I met members of the Chivirico community and with their gracious consent, took some wonderful portraits. As an additional bonus, on the last day our group had a full day model shoot with a troupe of professional dancers. It was an chance for composed shots with enthusiastic and ‘malleable’ subjects.  As a gesture of appreciation I agreed to send printed pictures back to the community.

And here is where reality bites.

Portraits that looked perfectly fine on screen showed up harsh and unflattering in print.  So many of these folks had been charming in person; I hated sending back ugly photos. I hastily adjusted the images, dialing back on clarity to soften the details and smoothe out natural skin imperfections.  Softer, toned down images resulted with improved print quality.  On screen the visual effect was almost as dramatic.

My lesson learned?  For close up portraits, particularly those slated for print and people you’d rather not hate you, hold back on the clarity.

On the other hand, for my model pictures I allowed for more dramatic license.  There were some pictures where I’d scaled back on the clarity, reprinted the image and then decided that I preferred the original.

For example this portrait of Graciano.   I think the hard lights on his face adds a gritty edginess to the picture.   It elevates it  from being a nice shot to being an interesting one.

Or so I think.   What about you?

Cuba-2200618
Before
Cuba-2200618
After

Photos taken Cuba. March 2018

Cuban Street Portraits

If you’re a fan of Street then you’ll know that the  #1 Fear of all new and no-so-new street photographers is the Fear of Strangers.  We all have a natural shyness about approaching strangers.  But if you’re like me, who believes that the only interesting street shot is one with a face in it, then you’ll figure out how to overcome this.

I admit that its easier to take street portraits when travelling abroad. There’s a comfortable camouflage in being a tourist. With hat, camera and obvious unfamiliarity with the language it’s easy to smile, point and share pictures on your camera.  Couple that with a few key words for beautiful, “Linda!” , “Bonito!”, “Muy hermoso!” and you have the magic for engaging with a stranger and making portraits.

The Portrait Shot

My favorite shots are those that capture an expression that hints at the personality.  Most of the time, I find it after after the initial photo, when I’ve come up close to share his/her picture on my camera’s LCD. The subject is now relaxed and I’m close enough for a very personal portrait shot.

If helps of course, to know a few more words of the language.  That way, I can walk away with a bit more knowledge of the person.   Granted, the knowledge may be incomplete and probably wrong (there’s a direct correlation between language proficiency and understanding) but at least I  have something more to remember him/her by.

The Cable Guy’s name was Alejandro (or maybe it was Guillermo.)  I’d been admiring his sturdy red truck. This being Cuba it was a solid, all metal 1960’s era vehicle, reconstructed from parts and a chimera of brands & manufacturers.  Alejandro was in the telephone cable business, he hauled telephone poles, dug & installed them … or so I understood.

The Cable Guy

Ramon the Guitar Player serenaded me with Cuban ballads played on his front porch.   He told me a long and involved story about his time in Santiago (it could have been Havana) where he met other chinos like me.

The Man in the Blue Box Balcony (sorry I don’t remember your name) was relaxing on his day off.  He asked me if I was staying at the local hotel and when I said “sí”, said that he worked there too.

Ramon the Guitarrista
Man in Blue Box Balcony

Abuelita was the charming grandmother of Tomás who found my walking group wandering in a dried out riverbed and invited us home for a visit.  Abuelita wanted to give me a manicure. Tomás introduced me to santeria … and the topic for another post.

Stay tuned until then.

Abuelita (Little Grandmother)

 

 

Chivirico, Cuba.  February 2018

A Walk through Chivirico

Neighborhood shop

As you may have guessed, I spent the last week in Cuba, although not  (as the song says) in Havana.  Instead we stayed at a little village called Chivirico, about 90 minutes out of Santiago de Cuba and 840 km east of Havana.

Chivirico is a small rural community set between the mountains of Sierra Maestra and the Caribbean Sea.  Our guide told us that 15,000 live in Chivirico but most stay in the mountains. My estimate is that 14,524 people live in the mountains  since there was no where close to that number of people in the village. Having said that, there’s no doubt on the total population as the hamlet was well serviced with a school, a church, a couple markets, a farmacia and bus terminal.    There was also a  lot of goats.  Not surprising since goats are the village’s namesake (chivo).

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Where there are schools there will be playing fields.  Cuba’s favorite sport is baseball and on this particular afternoon, I was treated to local game.  Everyone participated, even the goats.  And for those kids not old enough for the team, there’s lots of adventure to be had in the surrounding trees.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Chivirico, Cuba. 2018

Ooh Nah Na

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Somewhere in Canada it’s been snowing this past week.

I was not there.

Can you guess where?

If the pictures are not clue enough, the post’s title and this song are hints.   In fact, consider this song to be a backtrack for my next few posts.

Somewhere Not in Canada, February 2018

Sartorial Inequality

I suppose I should be more concerned with grander things.  Trump-o-mania. Plunging stock index. Escalating Syrian-Israeli-Iran crisis. North Korean everything.

But the thing I’d like to know is … how come Boris Pasternak ca 1920 looks like a LLBean model in 2018?

Consider the same of Virginia Woolf ca 1923.

Is there no justice in fashion evolution through the ages?  While men continue to wear the same old cable knit and trousers will women’s fashion constantly re-invent itself?

And really, will there ever be a time when floppy hats and lace curtains become stylish  again?

Oh … and if you’re keen on last week’s Lit Hub, click here.

California Jerk

The Sandy Food Chronicles

Google Jerk

This is a photo my daughter sent to me.  Here’s the chat* session we had. 


Hi Mom! This is what the cafe at work made for lunch today.

It looks like Rice & Peas ?

It’s Jamaican Rice & Peas with Jerk Chicken.

It don’t look like Jerk Chicken

The Rice & Peas was so-so and the chicken tasted

It looks like Curry Chicken

of  curry

But there’s no Curry in Jerk.
There’s no potatoes and gravy in Jerk.
All Jerk spices are black !

It didn’t taste of home at all

You should protest this

I can give them feedback

It is cultural misappropriation
of an iconic Jamaican dish.

Mom I have like
WORK to do

It’s OK dear.
You can come home and
I’ll make you real Jerk chicken

Thanks Mom!

🙂


(*) or something like it … same as much as this Californian style Jerk.

View original post